The state of Washington takes drug crimes seriously and imparts hefty penalties for those who are convicted of charges such as possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute. If you have recently been accused of, charged with or arrested for intent to sell, you’ll want to retain an attorney to help you through the criminal process and begin working on your case.

For a defense firm in Washington with a successful track record and fervency to provide stellar represent those accused of drug crimes, call our team at Daryl L. Graves, PLLC: 253-383-7777.

Possession with Intent to Distribute Charges

In Washington, possession with intent to distribute is categorized in the same manner as manufacturing or distributing the controlled substance; all three crimes are considered equally severe.

If you are charged with possession with intent to manufacture or deliver a highly addictive narcotic drug or amphetamine (a charge labeled a class B felony), you can face up to 10 years in prison and $25,000 to $100,000+ fine, depending on the amount of drugs found.

If the drugs involved in your case were less addictive, it might be labeled as a class C felony, which can mean five years in prison and a $5,000 fine. Illegal possession of marijuana carries distinct and unique penalties. If you’re unsure of what face or the maximum penalties of the offense, discuss your questions with an experienced defense attorney.

Possible Bases for Intent Charges

Law enforcement doesn’t have to catch you in the act of distributing/selling a controlled substance in order to arrest you or for the prosecution to charge you with intent. So how do they know that you intended to sell the drugs? Part of their assumption is usually based on the amount of drugs in your possession. Recreational users usually don’t have large amounts of drugs in their possession.

The amount of substance confiscated is only one factor, however. If officers find items such as baggies, scales, twist ties, etc. in your possession, home or car, it’s quite likely that they will elevate a possession charge to possession with intent to distribute.

Defenses for Intent to Sell Charges

There are a number of viable defenses that can be used to refute intent to distribute charges. Below are a few examples.

  • Lack of knowledge – In order to be convicted, the prosecution has to prove that you knowingly possessed an illegal drug. We might be able to show that you either didn’t know the drugs were in your possession or that you didn’t know the substance you were found with was illegal.
  • Lack of intent – We may be able to try to prove that the drugs were for your own use (a much lesser charge) and that you had no intent to distribute.
  • Search and seizure violations – If the evidence was obtained in an unlawful search and seizure (e.g., searching without a warrant or searching beyond the confines of the warrant), the evidence may be inadmissible and the case may be dropped.

Charged with a Drug Crime In Washington? We can help.

Our defense attorneys have been helping those accused of crimes for nearly four decades. Throughout the years, we have developed an arsenal of proven defense tactics and an intricate understanding of how to navigate the criminal justice system. We are passionate about protecting our clients’ rights and ensuring their cases are handled fairly, discreetly and in the best possible light.

Call Daryl L. Graves, PLLC in Washington today at 253-383-7777 for a one-on-one consultation with an intent to distribute defense attorney.